Julie Nocent-Vigil – N



edition of v.e.

dimensions in inches: 44 x 33 x .2


from Miss Ada Starr’s Penmanship Notebook, c. 1980, Tallgrass Impressions Joomchi Series

About this piece:
Using a process of repetitive kneading and binding of hanji with water, the artist considers her experience of an ancient marine landscape after a residency with the National Park Service at the Tallgrass National Preserve in the Flint Hills of Kansas. As records of a place perceived both as exterior and interior fields, this “map” records the experience of returning, tracing over paths traveled and rutted into the prairie earth. The artist work explores the narratives of prairie travelers returning and tracing paths rutted into the prairie earth over time, and the quest for direction amidst the rising and falling arcs of horizon. Traveler is coincident with center in passage and navigation on the prairie where direction can seem elusive. Arcs perceptibly rise and fall in the landscape and in one’s path, unfolding, subtle, fluid, and giving way to a sense of center, palpable, ever present.

This work is part of a project that examines traversing the powerful prairie environment so that both the art process recalls and the artifact maps such experience as memory and impression. The project considers series and repetition as deeply connected to the act of marking hallowed spaces and remembering – repetitive mark-making in stitch and print, kneading and binding repetitively in conjunction with water, here recall the Flint Hills washed and shaped with ancient waves over time. What is revealed and remembered in erosion?


paper, ink, thread

About the artist:

Julie Nocent-Vigil resides in Santa Fe, where she is developing projects in the printmaking and book arts department at the Santa Fe Community College and its Center for the Book. She did graduate studies in Native art history and architecture at the University of New Mexico, and completed an undergraduate degree at the University of Toronto in philosophy and religious studies. Her work incorporates fragments of text, erasure, and built layers to communicate an experience of memory and meaningful connections over time in the records of passage and personal geographies traced in the Southwest.

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